Two Roads

Bruchac, Joseph. Two Roads. New York: Puffin Books, 2019.
Twelve-year-old Cal and his father, homeless, travel across America by rail. It’s 1932, in the middle of the Great Depression, and countless poverty-stricken men are clambering onto freight trains, hoping not to be caught by the guards. But Cal is caught – by a surprise. His father tells him that they are Creek Indians. And now he is going to join a demonstration in Washington, D.C. to defend the rights of World War I veterans, so Cal is being dropped off in Oklahoma to stay at a residential school for native Americans.  Joseph Bruchac, author of numerous novels and picture books, skilfully tells a story of grief and hope. Recommended for readers 11 years old and up.

Note: All books published by Puffin are well-written. All stories by Joseph Bruchac are worth reading.

More stories of indigenous people of North America

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More stories set in Oklahoma

The true story of Winnie-the-Pooh

Walker, Sally M. Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2015.
Winnie-the-Pooh is a lovable bear who lives with his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood. At least in the books. But who was the real Winnie?
This biography tells the story. Harry Colebourn, a Canadian veterinarian, adopted a bear cub which he took along when he was shipped overseas during World War I. Winnie became the regiment’s mascot, named after its hometown of Winnipeg, Manitoba. But when the soldiers were sent over to France, Winnie couldn’t go along. This picture book tells the story of what happened to the little bear and how it became famous.
Illustrated in pen and ink and watercolour by Jonathan D. Voss and accompanied by black and white photographs, this gentle book is recommended for all readers fond of the honey-loving ‘Bear of Very Little Brain.’

More stories of World War I

More biographies, including another biography of the real Winnie-the-Pooh